Friday, August 21, 2015

A Short Farmington Outing with the D&D

Tommy Lynch's Drunk and Disorderly has to be one of the gnarliest most bad ass streamers I have ever fished. Brown trout see it and just instantly want it dead. It's uniquely trimmed dear hair head gives it some of the best action an artificial fly could have.

Today I finally got to try out the D&D I tied a few weeks ago on the Farmington River. The weather was prime for good streamer fishing. And, had I not been totally off my game, it would have been. I moved so many trout with the new fly I could not believe it. And some of them were pretty darn big. I use floating line because most of the water I fish is not so deep that the fly needs to be on the bottom, and often the fish would explode on the streamer sending spray in all directions. There were quite a few takes that really should have resulted in hook sets, but I am still breaking in a new rod and it has been a while since I last played with big trout and big flies. That being said I didn't get skunked. I landed one chunky beautiful brown on the D&D. My fishing partner for the day, David Gallipoli, caught quite a few fish on dries, including a brooky that may very well have been stream born. The cloudy wet conditions didn't hold out as long as I would have liked and things shut down before I could get back into the groove. Next time....



11 comments:

  1. RM
    Gorgeous brown, how deep is the area pictured in the image? Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thank you,
      I'm not sure. I was able to cross just above this. But the Farmington is often deceiving. There are places that look shallow but could sink a car.

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  2. Nice fish.
    You fared better than I did today. Fished four places on the Farmy and it was the slowest day in a long time. One brookie, and one rainbow. The bumps were not there either.

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    1. Thanks.
      I'm surprised. Around 8:30 heavy rising was occurring in our stretch.

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  3. WOW!! That looks like a great tie. What kind of action are using?
    Tie, fish, write and photo on...

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    1. It's a method called the jerk-strip.

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  4. That is a pretty crazy looking streamer! I would love to tie one, but that looks wayyyyy out of my league. Glad it produced a lot of strikes and follows for you, and I'm sure you'll turn those into landed fish next time. That brown has a huge tail...you could paddle a canoe with that thing! Glad to hear David got a brookie...what kind of dry was he using? Not heading out there any time soon, just curious.

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    1. Thanks,
      He had a two fly rig, a big caddis/stimulator typ fly with a BWO size 16 trailing. I think all the fish he caught took the olive.

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    2. Usually two fly rigs are dry dropper or nymph rigs, but that's pretty interesting how he uses two dries. I'll have to try that some time.

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    3. Actually it's quite common. It makes detecting the smaller fly MUCH easier at a distance or in the dark. Also allows you to match more than one bug in the case of overlapping hatch activity.

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    4. I figured it would help with visibility, but didn't really think about the overlapping hatches. Thanks for filling me in...learn something new every day!

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